Author: The Borgen Project

NOTTINGHAM, United Kingdom — In the Philippines, 20 million people need basic sanitation facilities. Without these facilities, communities are forced to drink unclean water and, in some cases, practice open defecation. This leaves them victim to a contamination cycle that reduces their clean water supply. There are competing uses of water in agriculture, domestic, temperature regulation and more and according to the British Geological Survey, this demand is expected to rise. Population in the Philippines is predicted to increase by up to 50% by 2050, putting even more strain on existing water sources. Waves for Water Philippines After the devastating impact of super-typhoon…

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PARIS, France — Situated in the north of South America, Colombia boasts expansive coastlines on the Caribbean Sea and the Pacific Ocean, encompassing a striking topography bordered by the countries Venezuela, Brazil, Peru and Ecuador to the east and south. For the last 60 years, this beautiful country has experienced one of the longest ongoing internal conflicts in the world. Consequently, it continues to struggle to ensure the protection of vulnerable populations, including children, from ongoing violence. Child recruitment in Colombia has been a problematic and consistent feature of the Colombian internal conflict, which has plagued civilians for the last few decades. The…

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LONDON, United Kingdom — Tea plays a pivotal role in the fight against global poverty because those in developing countries rely on it so heavily. Small-scale farmers and families produce 60% of global output, with around $8 billion of tea traded yearly as of 2022. This represents a large portion of those in developing nations and tea cultivation is helping to transform their livelihoods. Moreover, the revenue generated from taxes and tariffs on the tea trade allows developing countries to accumulate foreign reserves, making food imports more affordable. This, of course, alleviates some of the national burdens of poverty. Tea constitutes the…

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LOS ANGELES, California — Poverty in Uzbekistan remains a significant challenge despite ongoing efforts for economic development. Approximately 17.0% of the population lived below the national poverty line in 2021, indicating persistent economic disparities. Despite the country’s economic growth and progress in recent years, poverty rates remain higher in rural areas than in urban regions. This phenomenon highlights rural communities’ persistent challenges, including limited access to resources, education and employment opportunities, contributing to ongoing disparities in living standards across the country. In fact, three of every five poor people in Uzbekistan lived in a rural area in 2022. Hence, it…

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LONDON, United Kingdom — Energy poverty refers to the lack of access to modern energy services such as electricity and clean cooking fuels. Across Sub-Saharan Africa, 80% of households have to rely on biomass as a source of energy for cooking. Meanwhile, across the entire African continent, more than 40% lack access to electricity. Addressing the critical challenge, UpEnergy is at the forefront of operations, seeking to break the cycle of this type of poverty. Here is some information about its energy poverty solutions in Africa. About UpEnergy Established in 2010, UpEnergy responds to the inadequate flow of global climate finance for low-income projects in the Global South.…

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WALL, New Jersey — Professional athlete and Humanitarian for Sudanese refugees, Wenyen Gabriel began his life as a native of Khartoum, Sudan. As an infant, Wenyen and his family fled their home in Sudan during a civil war in the South, becoming Sudanese refugees. They escaped to Egypt, where they found accommodations. After living in Egypt for two years, the United Nations (U.N.) granted his family an appeal. They were relocated to Manchester, New Hampshire, United States, which supported a large South Sudanese population. In Manchester, Gabriel earned a high school diploma and developed skills as a basketball player. As a…

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NORWICH, United Kingdom — The U.S. President Malaria Initiative (PMI) originated in 2005 to help create a world without malaria. The initiative aims to expand proven and highly cost-effective malaria prevention and treatment measures by partnering with country leadership and their National Malaria Control Programs. Here is how the U.S. President Malaria Initiative is addressing malaria in Africa. Facts About Malaria in Africa Malaria is common in many African countries because of the habitable climate for Plasmodium Falciparum, the malaria parasite most likely to cause life-threatening illness. There are more than 200 million cases of malaria every year, resulting in at least half a million deaths…

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Belize, formerly British Honduras, is a small nation on Central America’s eastern coast. With a population of more than 400,000 and a life expectancy of just more than 70 years old, Belize grapples with multidimensional poverty affecting 35.7% of its residents. Access to proper nutrition, safe drinking water and quality education remain pressing issues for this vulnerable demographic. The Borgen Project recently spoke with Dr. Paul Whisnant, the visionary founder and CEO of International Servants (iServants), an organization dedicated to fighting child poverty in Belize. The Start of iServants Paul Whisnant’s journey to founding International Servants began in 1989 when,…

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ROCKHILL, South Carolina – Innovation in food and food production can turn many poverty-stricken areas around. In Vietnam, lychee fruit is doing that very thing. What Exactly is Lychee? Lychee is a fruit from the soapberry family that is prevalent in Southeast Asia. The fruit has a red color and spiky texture and is best eaten fresh. Lychee is also used in other products such as syrups and jams, as well as in some drinks. The fruit has a deep connection to countries of Asian origin, like Vietnam. Lychee Fruit Cultivation in Vietnam Lychee fruit has a rich history in Vietnam.…

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WALTHAM, Massachusetts — In November 2023, U.S. Senators Graham (R-SC), Boozman (R-AR) and Coons (D-DE) introduced S.3207, a bipartisan bill that, if passed, would establish the Foundation for International Food Security. This nonprofit, independent organization would aim to increase agricultural productivity in less-developed countries. The bill identifies less-developed countries with low-income, lower-middle-income or upper-middle-income economies. One can determine the status of a country by its gross national income (GNI), with low-income economies having a GNI per capita of $1,135 or less. About the Foundation for International Food Security Act Also known as the Foundation for International Food Security Act of 2023, the bill…

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