Author: Rachael Lind

Rachael writes for The Borgen Project from Colorado Springs, CO. She has a major in English with a focus in creative writing, as well as a minor in both psychology and history. Within these subjects, Rachael particularly enjoys focusing on the ideas of monstrosity (such as Dracula), conflicts such as war or rebellions, and how complex people and their actions can be. Rachael finds subjects such as astronomy, environmental science, and biology fascinating and is always looking to learn more.

SEATTLE — Telemedicine is one of the new ways that people are trying to fight poverty and improve everyone’s lives. The remote diagnosis and treatment of patients using telecommunications technology, it may become a crucial way to improve healthcare, eliminate poverty and empower women in developed and developing countries alike. In many areas, the problem with healthcare is often that it simply doesn’t exist, or if there is any healthcare, it is difficult to access, substandard or poorly staffed. Telemedicine can solve these problems in many areas. Though the technology can be difficult to obtain, creating a telemedicine clinic can…

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SEATTLE — Every year, hundreds of thousands of mothers die in childbirth, and much of the time, it is from a preventable or easily treatable issue. More than 30 percent of deaths from childbirth result from postpartum hemorrhaging, which is bleeding after giving birth. Postpartum hemorrhaging kills more than 130,000 women every year, and it disables another 2.6 million women after they give birth. The Uterine Balloon Tamponade (UBT) has been saving mothers from dying in childbirth for years. These kits include a medical balloon to insert into the uterus to apply pressure and stop the bleeding. However, these medical…

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SEATTLE — The basic idea of the poverty trap is relatively easy to understand; those already poor are unable to make enough to lift themselves out of poverty, so they are stuck in a cycle of poverty that is almost impossible to break without outside help. However, the poverty trap is more complicated than those already poor simply being unable to make the money needed to get out of poverty. Money is still an important issue, for poverty is essentially the lack of sufficient funds to comfortably survive. However, there are dozens of factors and causes of the poverty trap.…

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BEIJING — Smog is a danger to many people living in and around big cities. As countries continue to use more fossil fuels to keep up with the growing population, smog becomes an even more pressing issue. Although smog is a difficult problem to address, there are a few smog-filtering technologies to make it more manageable. Since China has some of the worst air pollution in the world, Chinese scientists are devoted to creating many smog-filtering technologies. In September 2016, Beijing installed Dutch designer Daan Roosegaarde’s Smog Free Towers around the city. These towers act like a smog vacuum cleaner,…

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SEATTLE — Protecting the environment has dozens of benefits, short term and long term. Energy conservation and more efficient sources reduce costs while also improving the quality of resources like water. Public outdoor spaces like local and national parks lead to healthier communities and reduced numbers of diseases. Decreasing air pollution is linked with an increase in life expectancy. The benefits go on and on. One of the many positive results from the combined benefits of going green is the potential to decrease and eventually eliminate poverty. Green economies focus on creating sustainable development while reducing environmental damage. Encouraging these…

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SEATTLE — Malaria is an infamous disease that threatens millions. In 2015, 200,000,000 people were infected, and 500,000 people, many of them children, died. Most people know that it is transmitted by mosquitos, but the details are not as well known. What is Malaria? Malaria is caused by a microorganism called plasmodia, a single parasitic cell that relies on mosquitos to survive. At the beginning of the cycle, sporozoites live in a female mosquito’s salivary glands. When the mosquito feeds on someone, the sporozoites enter the liver and hide from the immune system. They can stay there for up to…

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SEATTLE — There are occasional bleak days when news stories and statistics seem to prove that there is an unbeatable amount of inequality and suffering. In these despairing moments when righteousness and equality seem like a fairy tale, people search for answers and a purpose behind the injustices of the world. The reality is unpleasant and hard to swallow; the world is chaotic, unjust and unforgiving at times. Life isn’t fair, but this seemingly despondent assessment of the world is not beyond hope or the possibility of change. In many ways, coming to this conclusion is an important step toward…

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SEATTLE — Microloans are an increasingly popular method to address global poverty. Microlenders give small loans, anywhere from $10 to over $1000, with the hope that these loans will enable people to become entrepreneurs and start their own income generating business or project. However, while various studies have shown that microlending reduces poverty, microloans are not a magical solution. To better understand how the loans work, it is important to consider the benefits as well as the risks. According to a study done by Quanda Zhang, a researcher in Economics at RMIT University, microlending has the potential to “lift more…

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SEATTLE — Child marriage is one of the most crushing and demoralizing things that can happen to a young girl, and there are millions of girls around the world who are forced to experience it. Roughly one in three girls in the developing world marry before the age of 18. With no real choice in the matter, her dreams and goals are forced aside. Along with the psychological costs to the child brides, child marriage carries many real risks to the health and future of the girls. They have higher levels of marital rape and domestic violence. There is also…

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SEATTLE — Poverty does not have one simple solution, for it is not a simple matter of money. There are dozens of causes and variables that interweave and link with one another in creating poverty, such as poor healthcare, lack of education and environmental changes to name a few. However, economics are often a key factor to these issues. Though money alone cannot solve poverty, providing a basic income could help over 66 countries eradicate extreme poverty and begin to address deeper issues. Basic income occurs when the government provides all citizens with enough money to keep people out of…

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