Author: Melissa Binns

Melissa is from Charlotte, North Carolina, and will soon graduate from Queens University of Charlotte. Her major is Communication with a concentration in Journalism, and her minor is Human Services Studies. Melissa is passionate about animal and human rights. She is only 5’0”, and not getting any taller.

WASHINGTON — Though faced with an enormous task, World Bank president Jim Yong Kim believes he has a plan to rid the world of extreme poverty by 2030. According to a speech Kim gave at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, there are three main things that need to happen for this goal to become reality: growth, investment and insurance. “The world economy needs to grow faster, and grow more sustainably. It needs to grow in a way that makes sure some of our vast wealth goes to the poor,” Kim explains. “The second part of the…

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SEATTLE — While cellular phones have been regarded as a luxury in the past, providing them to the poor—especially poor women—can give someone the boost he or she needs to make his or her way out of poverty. For many people, cell phones provide financial services. For two and a half billion people around the world, however, there is no access to financial services, and for women, they are 20 percent less likely to have access to financial services or banking technology in comparison to a male peer. “In ways big and small, life without access to financial services is more difficult, expensive…

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CHARLOTTE, North Carolina — Tsunamis and earthquakes can be devastating, and unfortunately, developing countries usually get hit the hardest. Natural disasters can set an impoverished country even further back and add to the struggle the people of that county face. Even worse, the world is facing twice as many of these incidents than it was 30 years ago, and it is predicted that such incidents will occur more frequently as time goes on. Because of this, the World Bank is teaming up with The Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery, or GFDRR, and the UK Department for International Development, or DFID, to address…

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WASHINGTON — After five years in the position, U.S. Agency for International Development administrator Rajiv Shah stepped down in mid-February. Shah entered the role shortly after the 2010 Haitian earthquake, where he oversaw the largest food distribution operation in history in response to the natural disaster. Before this, he was the director of the agriculture development program for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. “It was President Obama’s call to end extreme poverty — made in two State of the Union addresses — that reenergized our Agency and elevated our work in the national security agenda,” said Shah in a…

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SEATTLE — Have you heard of “gift-in-kind” charities? A gift-in-kind charity accepts donations of items which are then redistributed to the people who need them. One of these charities is the Brother’s Brother Foundation, which provides medical and educational supplies to the countries in need. Founded in 1958 by Dr. Robert Hingson, the organization supplies 146 countries with the necessities they are lacking. This includes more than 98.9 million books, 18,600 tons of food and more than 13,600 tons of medical supplies. Originally, the organization was called “Brother’s Keeper,” until a Nigerian medical student told Hingson “We don’t need a…

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