Author: Staff Reports

CUBA — “In 1959, Fidel Castro established a socialist state in Cuba closely aligned with the” ideology of the Soviet Union. Castro ruled as a dictator, providing free healthcare and education but suppressing all political opposition and routinely violating human rights. Although new reforms have been implemented in Fidel Castro’s regime, Cuba’s political structure has changed very little. These 10 facts about human rights in Cuba demonstrate the country’s authoritarian system that undermines human rights. 10 Facts About Human Rights in Cuba Freedom of Expression: The government controls all media, which means they have the power to limit speech, press or…

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SYRACUSE, New York — One of the poorest cities in the country is also home to a large refugee population. More than 10,000 refugees from around the world have been welcomed with open arms by the people of Syracuse. A majority of the refugees are arriving from Asian and African countries such as Bhutan and Somalia. Unfortunately, there are few job opportunities in the city. However, there is hope as Syracuse RISE, an organization run primarily by former refugees, is there to help new immigrants and refugees settle into their new lives. The Refugee Crisis in Asia Throughout the 1990s, Bhutan began targeting…

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SEATTLE, Washington — Shawn Mendes is an international pop star who has taken the world by storm with his musical career. He is using his platform in a new way. At the end of August, Mendes announced the launch of his new philanthropic foundation, the Shawn Mendes Foundation, which will focus on advocating for youth-related causes. The Shawn Mendes Foundation The foundation places an emphasis on worldwide causes such as bullying prevention, children’s healthcare access, mental health, advocating for human rights and access to education. Additionally, it inspires the younger generation by providing them with a platform to take initiative…

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SEATTLE, Washington — Dracunculiasis (also known as Guinea Worm Disease) is not the most common disease around. The only reason this disease has reached this state of obscurity is due to the hard work of NGOs and an ambitious plan enacted to achieve a milestone in humanitarian aid and the elimination of dracunculiasis and poverty. Dracunculiasis and Poverty Dracunculiasis is a parasitic disease caused by the Dracunculiasis medinensis larvae. Humans contract these larvae when they drink from a water source tainted with infected water fleas. The infected will show no symptoms during the first year. After the worm has grown,…

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SEATTLE, Washington — Philanthropist and anti-apartheid activist Nelson Mandela did much for his country and people. In addition to being a vocal human rights activist, he created charities and programs for South Africans in need. After his release from prison and the subsequent presidential election, Mandela set up a network of charities that have continued running even after his death, carrying on his legacy and vision. Here are three examples of Nelson Mandela’s charity work. Nelson Mandela’s Children Fund To help end the suffering of children in poverty, Nelson Mandela donated a third of his presidential salary to start Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund. This organization strives to change how society…

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SEATTLE, Washington — Innovation is a critical part of poverty reduction. New technology can assist with healthcare, agriculture, education and other important development areas. But innovation doesn’t happen spontaneously. New ideas need careful development and execution by extraordinary people looking to better the world. Soraya Fouladi is an innovator who is revolutionizing education technology for poor populations. Who is Soraya Fouladi? Soraya Fouladi grew up in New York City and gained an international perspective early in life. Attending the United Nations International High School, Soraya learned about global issues until finally coming to the conclusion that insufficient education is a major issue for developing countries. After graduating high school, Soraya…

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SEATTLE, Washington — The 2019 Economics Nobel Prize Winners fight poverty with their work. Abhijit Banerjee, Esther Duflo and Michael Kremer used an “experimental approach to alleviating global poverty” with their research. Their work has drastically transformed development economics over the past two decades. The Prize Winners Abhijit Banerjee received his education at the University of Calcutta, Jawaharlal Nehru University and Harvard University where he received his Ph.D. in 1988. He works as the Ford Foundation International Professor of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He founded the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) in 2003 alongside Esther Duflo. He is also a past president of the Bureau…

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SEATTLE, Washington — The current number of forcibly displaced people around the globe is more than 68 million. This means that every two seconds, one person is displaced from his or her home. While it is imperative that these people find a safe place to replant their lives, developing countries without the proper infrastructure or economic development are receiving a large number of these refugees. In order to analyze the impact of migration on developing countries, it’s crucial to also discuss the causes and solutions. Causes of Forced Migration The causes of forced migration are usually a combination of political,…

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KIGALI, Rwanda — In Rwanda, The Women’s Bakery has developed a network of female-run bakeries to create gainful employment for women to cook and sell affordable and nutritious bread through profitable establishments. Like bread rising in the oven, this organization is lifting East African women to greater heights. The Borgen Project interviewed Markey Culver, CEO and Founder of The Women’s Bakery (TWB). “We define poverty as the absence of choice. So, our mission is to empower women in order to reclaim this choice,” Culver said. TWB provides the education and skills needed to work in the bakeries. Women can then…

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SEATTLE, Washington — Digital financial inclusion is access to formal financial services on a digital platform for marginalized populations. Examples of formal financial services are bank accounts, savings accounts, money transfers and credit. For digital financial inclusion to be useful where it’s most needed, such services must be tailored to the needs of the market. They also need to be executed responsibly and cost-efficient to the customers and providers. Gaining Access to Digital Finances The U.N. estimates that 2 billion people in developing countries do not have access to bank accounts. That means these individuals lack the availability of primary forms of formal financial services. Yet,…

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