Author: Staff Reports

Political Director at The Borgen Project.

SEATTLE — While many people often focus conversations about poverty on areas where extreme poverty is prevalent, poverty — at many levels — is found across the globe. Sweden, while often viewed as a model for progressive an effective welfare, continues to deal with poverty in the 21st Century. Here are the top 10 facts about poverty in Sweden. Top 10 Facts About Poverty in Sweden Even though levels are low, poverty does exist in Sweden. Despite working, seven percent of Swedish citizens live at the EU’s risk-of-poverty line. Those living with a disposable income low enough to be deemed…

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SEATTLE — Led by Stanford’s Graduate School of Business (GSB), the Stanford Institute for Innovation in Developing Economies (Seed) is working to end the cycle of global poverty. Through a year-long training program, Stanford Seed provides business leaders in developing countries with the tools and skills needed to improve and grow their companies. Seed is active in East Africa, southern Africa, West Africa and most recently in India. Seed was launched in 2012 following a $150 million donation from Robert and Dorothy King, the founders of King Philanthropies, an organization whose mission statement is to “alleviate extreme poverty by magnifying…

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SEATTLE — A small Eastern African country covering an area of only 23,000 sq km, Djibouti’s approach to education has wavered over the years. While in richer neighborhoods in the capital almost all children attend school, people living in shanty settlements or rural areas don’t have the same privilege. What is alarming is the state of girls’ education in Djibouti, specifically the disparity between the number of girls and the number of boys attending school. In recent years, however, Djibouti has benefitted from American aid and is hoping to do more to turn the situation around, especially for its young female population.…

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SEATTLE — In developing countries across the globe, many people suffer from micronutrient deficiencies, stemming from improper nourishment and leading to a number of health problems. Vitamin A and iodine deficiencies have serious consequences for mothers and children, making it imperative that they have access to supplements for these nutrients if they are not getting them naturally through their diet. Vitamin A Supplementation Critical in Addressing Micronutrient Deficiencies Vitamin A deficiency weakens the immune system, causing children to have an increased risk of contracting infections (including measles) or diarrheal illnesses, which often prove fatal. Approximately one-third of impoverished children are…

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SEATTLE — In Brazil, access to healthcare before, during and after giving birth is a continuing problem for many women. Maternal healthcare in Brazil is particularly inaccessible for poor women in rural areas, and Brazil’s maternal mortality rates (MMRs) are five to 10 times higher than in countries with a similar economic status. Based on estimates from 2015, it is clear that Brazil has made progress over the past few decades. In 1990, there were 104 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births, and by 2015, this ratio had been reduced to 44 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. The United…

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SEATTLE — Since August 2017, Bangladesh has accepted approximately 693,000 Rohingya refugees from Myanmar, more than half of whom are children. Hundreds more arrive each week, fleeing state-sponsored violence against their ethnic group. Many Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh live in overcrowded settlements, while others reside within local communities. Their presence has greatly impacted Bangladesh and its citizens, and organizations including UNHCR, UNICEF and Oxfam are working diligently to improve their conditions and find a long-term solution to this crisis. The Struggle to Accommodate Large Numbers of Rohingya Refugees in Bangladesh Seventy-three percent of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh are living in…

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SEATTLE — Since the mid-1990s, several countries have abolished school fees in Africa for public primary education, responding to evidence that these costs were preventing impoverished children from being able to obtain an education. In the absence of school fees, enrollment rates in sub-Saharan Africa increased by 42 percent between 2000 to 2007; however, being able to provide high-quality education to this influx of new students has proven to be a new challenge for African schools. School Fees in Africa a Declining Trend School fees in Africa have their origin in the post-colonial period, when newly independent African countries created…

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SEATTLE — With its 1,100-mile coastline on the Mediterranean Sea, Libya has become a crossing point for many Middle Eastern and African refugees hoping to reach Europe. As of June 1, 2018, there are 52,031 asylum seekers and refugees in Libya registered with UNHCR, the U.N.’s Refugee Agency, as well as 179,400 internally displaced persons (IDPs). UNHCR helps refugees and IDPs in Libya by monitoring government detention centers, providing medical consultations, helping individuals apply for resettlement and assisting with evacuation. The Plight of Refugees in Libya Of the six countries that border Libya, five are plagued by war or violent…

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SEATTLE — On April 9, 2018, the U.S. Senate passed the AGOA and MCA Modernization Act unanimously. This Act will strengthen the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), two programs that have proven effective in improving the lives of millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa. The MCC spurs economic development, allowing developing countries to address deficiencies in communications, transportation and energy networks. AGOA offers duty-free access to the U.S. market for most exports from eligible sub-Saharan African nations; it was enacted in 2000 and has been renewed until 2025. By authorizing the MCC to…

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JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — South Africa has joined a growing list of countries that have decriminalized marijuana, opening up the country to new business opportunities and economic possibilities. Most significantly, it will reduce the number of people caught up in the cycle of poverty and the criminal justice system. It’s worth examining the potential outcomes of legal marijuana in South Africa. Dagga and Apartheid On September 18, South Africa officially legalized “dagga” or marijuana. The Constitutional Court decriminalized the private possession and use of cannabis, saying that the previous law “is an infringement of the right to privacy of an adult…

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