Author: Katie Grovatt

Katie writes for The Borgen Project from Waco, Texas. She is studying journalism at Baylor University, and hopes to one day change the world with the stories she tells.

BEIJING — In the enormous nation of China, about 70 million people live below the poverty line. This is equivalent to the entire population of the United Kingdom. The sheer quantity of poor people in this nation made it all the more shocking when China last year announced its plan to eliminate poverty by 2020. In 2015 at the Global Poverty Reduction and Development Forum, China’s President Xi Jinping announced the five-year plan to eradicate poverty. “If the government takes concrete and effective action, China can lift 10 million people out of poverty every year from 2017 to 2020,” President Jinping announced to…

Read More

SEATTLE — There have been multiple studies published that prove childhood poverty affects the ability of emotional control later in adult life. It is thought that the stressful exposure poverty brings to developing brains causes permanent damage to the brains ability to deal with stress. This fact was published by a research project done by Professor K. Luan Phan who is Director of the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Research Programs at the University of Illinois at Chicago. “Our findings suggest that the stress-burden of growing up poor may be an underlying mechanism that accounts for the relationship between poverty as…

Read More

SEATTLE — Fiji smiles at the world with great sparkling oceans, wispy palm trees and white beaches. However, there is a great deal of poverty in Fiji hidden behind the beautiful scenery. Fiji is comprised of over 300 islands. Amongst these islands, life expectancy is low, nutritious food remains in shortage and unemployment is high. More than 250,000 Fijian people live below or just above the poverty line. Much of the poverty in Fiji is due to the isolation of the islands themselves. Efficient delivery of health care, education, and other valuable social services is difficult and thus scarce. Organizations…

Read More

SEATTLE — HIV/AIDS has been a wave of destruction in the global poverty sphere. Currently there are 36.7 million people worldwide living with this awful disease. The good news is governments have mightily stepped up funding for HIV/AIDS programs to change these harsh statistics. Government funding for HIV/AIDS programs such as the Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis and Malaria; the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and the Global Fund are just few that have changed individuals’ lives. The following stories may be simple, but they demonstrate that support, can cause dramatic changes in the lives of…

Read More

SEATTLE — According to a June 2016 study conducted by researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, malnutrition and preventable diseases kill fewer children today than ever before. PLoS Medicine published this study of cognitive deficits, showing fascinating results. Unfortunately, some negative revelations tied to the study arose. Numbers indicated that though deaths are dropping, children are still failing to meet certain milestones in life crucial to their development. The study brought to light that over one-third of young children in developing nations between the age of three and four fall behind in their cognitive growth. A significant…

Read More

SEATTLE — South Africa has developed a new way to combat the AIDS epidemic. Antiretroviral drugs will now be dispensed through vending machines placed near homes, allowing quick and easy access to medicine for those in need. These Automated Antiretroviral Drug Machines (ADM) were developed at the Helen Joseph hospital in Johannesburg with the help of the non-profit organization Right To Care. The machine will dispense antiretroviral drugs to patients in local areas of their communities, allowing them to save time, money, and energy when obtaining the drugs they need. Patients will be able to use their “smartcard ID” and a type of…

Read More

SEATTLE — Representative Ed Royce (R-CA-39) became the House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman in January of 2013. However, his active voice has been guiding the Foreign Affairs Committee much longer than that. Throughout his 12 years of service in Congress, he has been a champion for global poverty reduction efforts. In his initial years of service, Royce served as the chair of the Africa Subcommittee. From 1997 to 2004, he spent his leadership skills fighting for the rights of Africa. He held more than 70 hearings dealing with improving the lives of Africans and improving relations with the U.S. and Africa.…

Read More

SEATTLE — The United Nations announced they would be stepping up operations to prevent a possible cholera outbreak in South Sudan. A national cholera taskforce has been enforced in the country, composed of the Ministry of Health, the World Health Organization (WHO), UNICEF and other partners. According to the U.N. News Centre, 271 cases have been documented with 14 deaths since July 12. Many cases of cholera are unconfirmed due to a lack of necessary laboratory equipment for a proper diagnosis. Humanitarian groups are working hard to address these issues according to a report made by XINHUANET.com. Unice Keji, a…

Read More

SEATTLE — The United Nations has launched a new program designed to pave a way to reach the global goal of ending hunger by 2030. This new program aimed at poverty reduction that started in Munich, Germany is known as the Innovation Accelerator. The food relief agency of the United Nations designed this program to solidify and nurture new technologies and underdeveloped business models. Its plan is to utilize the humanitarian group World Food Programme (WFP) by combining staff members, experts and entrepreneurs from the private and public sectors to create  efficient emergency response and poverty-reduction efforts. The Innovation Accelerator will…

Read More

SEATTLE — A well-esteemed global poverty researcher is speaking out about the growing threats of climate change and economic inequality throughout the world. He advocates for a new method and reform for poverty reduction efforts. As Executive Director of the Global Development Institute (GDI) at The University of Manchester, Professor David Hulme has great knowledge of the necessities of addressing the problems of the developing world. He urges the richest nations of the world to increase their poverty reduction efforts in the book he published on June 17, titled, “Should Rich Nations Help the Poor?” According to Hulme, the reasoning…

Read More