Author: Jennifer Philipp

SEATTLE, Washington — Naturally, the suffering caused by COVID-19 in any country, despite its development status, is immeasurable. However, developing countries are struggling to cope with COVID-19 exponentially more than developed nations due to pre-existing complications. For example, the U.N. projects Africa will have a total of 300,000 deaths by the end of the year, over twice as high as the global total of 143,744 as of May 2020. The World Bank is aiding developing countries amid the COVID-19 pandemic in order to help economies regain footing and survive the global health crisis. The World Bank Aids Developing Countries The situation is…

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SEATTLE, Washington — The U.S. remained the largest single-country donor in response to global efforts to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, committing more than $900 million to more than 120 countries. Included in the recipient list are several countries in Africa, which has more than 5.6 million cases. While African countries reported a slower spread of the coronavirus, the number of confirmed cases is rising in some areas, such as Ghana’s major cities. Ghana and Rwanda dependably demonstrated their support for international peacekeeping. U.S. investments provided Ghana and Rwanda with life-saving aid, through drones delivering U.S. medical aid to the countries,…

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SEATTLE, Washinton — As of May 2020, there are more than 5.8 million COVID-19 cases around the globe. Out of the 5.9 million, the indigenous populations worldwide are taking an enormous hit. Along with preexisting strains from poverty, the impact of COVID-19 in indigenous communities is disproportionally damaging. Despite being a presence in over 90 countries, they fall under 15% of the world’s extremely poor. Moreover, the struggles to maintain land ownership puts pressure on family life and oppression toward ethnic minorities affects indigenous communities’ socio-economic advancement. Due to these challenges, indigenous populations are especially vulnerable to viruses like COVID-19.…

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SEATTLE, Washington — The COVID-19 pandemic has affected people worldwide, yet the already-vulnerable refugee populations have suffered the impacts of the virus more acutely than most. For example, more than 70% of displaced people in Syria live below the poverty line and these socio-economic situations continue to worsen amid the pandemic. Refugees often live in densely populated settlements or camps, putting these groups at an even higher risk of contracting the virus. Additionally, countries with large refugee populations often have poor and less accessible healthcare systems; most refugees do not have access to healthcare services at all. However, the United…

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DHAKA, Bangladesh — More than 21 million people surround the municipal urban center of Dhaka, Bangladesh. As a broad range of social classes inhabits the eighth-most populated nation in the world, social distancing among dense slum communities during COVID-19 in Bangladesh is near impossible. Proper sanitation has proven difficult in impoverished areas where multiple families share bathrooms and the cost of hand soap is unaffordable.  A reported 26,738 cases of COVID-19 have resulted in 386 deaths and these numbers continue to rise. The Bengali government has administered above 160,000 tests and recorded about 5,207 recovered cases, though this accounts for…

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SEATTLE, Washington — An estimated 49 million people may face extreme poverty in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the World Bank. E-commerce may be a potential solution to prevent this drastic rise in global poverty. This technology benefits the population by connecting consumers and businesses through digital platforms, overcoming market and physical barriers. Given the current climate and cultural shift of worldwide social distancing and stay at home orders, e-commerce, or online shopping, has become the “new normal” for many. In 2018, Yale University reported that a vast majority of the 1.1 billion digital buyers worldwide live in developing…

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SEATTLE, Washington — As COVID-19 in the Philippines continues to be a problem, the government is struggling to curb the spread of the virus and secure resources for its people. The delayed reaction of the Duterte administration mixed with its inability to provide stability for its projected 1.2 million newly unemployed citizens has created a situation in which the nation needs dire help. The good news, however, comes in the form of foreign aid. Many neighboring Southeast Asian countries have answered the Philippines’ need for assistance.  COVID-19 in the Philippines The Philippines stands as one of Southeast Asia’s hardest-hit nations…

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HAVANA, Cuba — Cuba manages to shine as a glowing example of the effectiveness of foreign aid as the world continues to combat the ongoing global pandemic. It ranked number one on the World Bank’s physicians per 1000 people charts in 2017 with 8.1. Cuba’s response to COVID-19 involves sending more and more Cuban medical professionals abroad each week to those countries that need it most. Cuba’s quick, internationally-minded answer to the pandemic embodies its history of providing medical aid abroad. It exemplifies how foreign aid can mean a world of difference in the face of crisis. Cuba’s “Medical Internationalism” Cuba…

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SEATTLE, Washington — The baseball world regards Mariano Rivera as an All-Star pitcher. In fact, he is the only player to be unanimously accepted into the MLB Hall of Fame. However, Rivera’s lesser-known achievements stem from his humanitarian work providing education to underprivileged children in both the United States and his country of birth, Panama. Rivera’s philanthropic work has earned him the ROBIE Humanitarian Award in 2014 as well as the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2019. The Mariano Rivera Foundation In 1998, he founded the Mariano Rivera Foundation to build schools, provide scholarships and generate relief funds for suffering people…

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SEATTLE, Washington — Born in Afghanistan in the midst of a civil war, Sonita Alizadeh’s advocacy for women’s liberation stems from her own experience. As far back as the early 1900s, progressive leaders have attempted to improve women’s status, raise the marriage age and abolish the price for brides, which was the heaviest household expense for rural communities. However, with interpretations of Islamic practices in Afghanistan varying regionally, attempts to modernize gender roles were heavily contested by those in favor of protecting their traditional, kinship-ordered, patriarchal social structure. A Brief History Because child brides and price represented a way to…

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