Author: Evan Winslow

JONESBORO, Georgia — Vietnam is home to 100,000 amputees. Additionally, the leftover two million unexploded mines and ordinances after the Vietnam War continue to take the limbs of thousands of men, women and children annually. Dr. Ha Van Vo, a biomedical engineering professor at Mercer University, set out to develop prosthetics for these amputees with the help of the institution. About Dr. Vo Dr. Vo, the son of a U.S.-trained army officer in the Republic of Vietnam, was young when he “experienced many of the horrors of the Vietnam War.” After moving to the U.S. in 1990, he worked first…

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Chicago, Illinois — In an attempt to protect from economic disaster in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, governments enacted an unprecedented number of social protection programs. According to the World Bank, Social protection “traditionally consists of labor markets, pensions, social funds and ‘safety nets’.” Although developing countries introduced 1,300+ social protection and jobs programs related to COVID-19, the International Labor Organization (ILO) “estimates 255 million full-time equivalent” job losses in 2020. Another 90-130 million losses are estimated in 2021. Liquidity Support and Labor Regulations The World Bank stated that the provision of liquidity support to firms and labor regulation…

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CHARLESTON, South Carolina — Healthcare policy focusing on mental illness is still developing in many areas around the world. While many nations have made strides toward accessible mental health care for patients, others still lack the proper resources to offer comprehensive mental health services. According to the World Health Organization, Asia, which stretches across four of the total six WHO regions, contains varied, nonstandardized systems meant to address mental health. Myanmar is one country affected by systemic mental health challenges. Prevalence in Asia Mental health care faces different challenges across Asia’s numerous countries and regions. Consistency and implementation within Asia…

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CLEMSON, South Carolina — Switzerland has pledged to give $12 billion between 2021 and 2024 in an ambitious effort to reduce global poverty and increase peacemaking measures around the globe. With this investment, Switzerland further commits itself as one of the world’s leaders in spending for international aid. Switzerland placed eighth worldwide in 2018 with 0.46% of its GDP given toward international aid. For reference, the United States gave only 0.18% in 2018. The Swiss are carefully investing the money too. Switzerland’s foreign aid reduces international poverty and sets an example for other high-income nations. Targeting the International Refugee Crisis…

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ST. PAUL, Minnesota — Ongoing conflicts often lead to the consequence of poverty. Moreover, poverty can continue to follow a community, region or country long after any active violence has ended. The effect of trauma, both on an individual and societal level following a conflict, can cause further harm to communities as they work to move forward. Poverty in Northern Ireland exemplifies this. The region contends with the legacy of the Troubles even more than 20 years after achieving peace. The Troubles The Troubles, as the conflict came to be known, was a period of violence spanning 30 years. The…

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PARIS, France — For the past six years, migrants from countries such as Afghanistan, Sudan, Ethiopia and Eritrea have lived in what is called the “Calais jungle” in the north of France. The migrants wish to reach the U.K. to achieve a visa and a better life. However, many are living at the border in violent and unsanitary conditions. The Human Rights Observers declared that, in January 2021, migrants were still the targets of human rights violations in the area. To better understand the humanitarian and sanitary emergency in Calais, The Borgen Project spoke with President François Guennoc of L’Auberge…

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WEST WINDSOR,  Vermont — “I grew up like all children in Mali. My father was a mason; we farmed a lot during the rainy season. I learned to farm and then at the age of seven I went to school with my older brother.” Mahim Toure was born in Bandiagara, a rural area of Central Mali. As a young child, Toure spent a lot of time helping the family complete the tasks necessary to a subsistence lifestyle. These included collecting food and water and tending to livestock. While Toure was young, Mali became independent from France, entering a period of…

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