Author: Claire Olmstead

BRISTOL, United Kingdom — Vulnerable people fleeing persecution and human rights abuses is not new. Following the atrocities of World War II, the 1951 Refugee Convention came about, guaranteeing “everybody the right to apply for asylum” in a country that has signed the Convention. However, there are many misconceptions when it comes to refugees and what is termed a “refugee crisis.” Alexa Netty, the Executive Director of SolidariTee, spoke to The Borgen Project. Netty says the greatest misconception is that global citizens feel there is a choice in accepting or rejecting refugees. Referring to the Refugee Convention, she explains that…

Read More

DALLAS, Texas — Israel has grown immensely in terms of social and economic influence as of late. Focus on foreign investment and resources has increased during the past few decades. The country approved a pipeline deal with Europe in August 2020 to use Tamar deposits to supply natural gas to the continent. With these changes, there is another area that has seen improvements: Israel’s agriculture. Agricultural Growth in Israel In terms of the economy, one of the most important areas of growth is agriculture. Considering that the country is partially desert and has an arid climate with brief periods of…

Read More

RAYMOND, Maine — The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) often works with the local organizations in USAID operating regions to provide funding or coordinate efforts. On July 28, 2021, Sens. Kaine [D-VA] and Rubio [R-FLA] introduced bill S.2509, the New Partnerships Initiative Authorization Act (NPIAA). This bill seeks funding that will allow USAID to expand its partnership base and ease the process for USAID to develop organizational partnerships. Breaking Down S.2509 – The New Partnerships Initiative Act The New Partnerships Initiative Authorization Act would lessen the requirements for potential partners of USAID and allocate more funding for USAID…

Read More

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina — The Peace Corps, works with communities around the globe to find long-term solutions to the world’s most urgent issues. However, as a program that relies on volunteers traveling domestically and internationally, COVID-19 has altered the way the Peace Corps operates. Although this has been a challenging adjustment, the Peace Corps is still making a global impact to serve marginalized and impoverished communities around the world. Throughout COVID-19, the mission has remained the same. To learn more about The Peace Corps, The Borgen Project spoke with Sierra Plato, a Peace Corps Regional Recruiter and Returned Volunteer. The…

Read More

LOS ANGELES, California — “Favela” is a cultural term used in Brazil to describe the country’s shantytowns or slums. Nowadays, some people advocate that this term is diminishing and should be replaced by “comunidades” [communities]. There is no consensus on the origin of the favelas. Some theories defend that they started to spread and grow as a consequence of slavery abolition in 1888 as well as immigration in the 1930s and 1940s. Other research points to a big wave of immigrants leaving the countryside for the cities between 1940 and 1970. From shelters made of discarded materials to houses made…

Read More

DOWNINGTOWN, Pennsylvania — Since 9/11, poverty reduction has been on the radar of developed countries as a means to counterterrorism. However, people are still skeptical of the connection between poverty and terrorism. Violent extremism exploits numerous factors and utilizes many variables, much like a mathematical equation. However, there is not one single variable that determines violent extremism. That is why it is important to understand the truths about terrorism and its connection to poverty. Understanding the extremism equation can help dispel myths about terrorism. Myth #1: Poverty Does Not Correlate With a Higher Incidence of Terrorism Despite correlations between impoverished…

Read More

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND, Washington — Nicaragua is one of the most impoverished countries in Central America, afflicted by political instability, violence and natural disasters. In April 2018, protests in the capital of Managua erupted over suggested changes to the social security program, which would essentially require Nicaraguans to pay more taxes without receiving more benefits. The government crackdown on protests resulted in the deaths of more than 300 people. Since then, political unrest and human rights violations continue to harm Nicaragua’s economy and citizens’ security. Poverty in Nicaragua increased by more than 1% between 2019 to 2020, pushing more Nicaraguans into…

Read More

New York, NY — One often hears that human necessities include access to food, water and shelter. Although this is certainly true to an extent, it also fails to address the nuance that rests in those words. Humans need healthy and sustainable food, clean water and shelter. Along with that, we need adequate, sustainable energy for long-term positive growth. A lack of access to sustainable energy means one is in fuel poverty. This is an issue that plagues much of the world. In France, fuel poverty is heightened by the rising home energy costs.  What Is Fuel Poverty? Fuel poverty…

Read More

NAPLES, Florida — The Swiss nonprofit Social Income asks, “What would change if you gave away 1% of your income every month? Not much, right?” It is based on these questions and a strong belief in universal basic income (UBI) that Sandino Scheidegger founded the organization, which works toward alleviating global poverty through direct cash transfers to the impoverished citizens of Sierra Leone. Social Income is taking advantage of the burgeoning use of mobile banking platforms in Africa and is alleviating poverty by facilitating “human to human” assistance. A Short and Promising History Social Income’s premise is simple: connect people…

Read More

WARREN, New Jersey — Period poverty, water scarcity, and girls’ education are all issues that affect African women and girls daily. However, these issues are interconnected. Period poverty, water scarcity and a lack of access to girls’ education keep the cycle of global poverty alive for women and girls. Water Scarcity as a Women’s Issue In Sub-Saharan Africa, women and young girls physically and metaphorically carry the water burden. While men are expected to find work, women and girls are expected to take care of children and acquire water. Journeys can take hours. In some countries, the journey can be…

Read More