Getting Involved: What are the Key Qualifications for Senate?

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WASHINGTON, D.C. — If you were to recall your high school or middle school courses on American politics then this questions should not be too hard to answer. If you cannot remember the specifics of the Senate, then sometimes it’s easier to think about the qualifications for Senate office as watered-down qualifications for the presidency. To become president, all one must be is:

– At least 35 years of age.
– A resident within the United States for at least 14 years.
– And a natural born Citizen.
To gain office in the Senate, all one must be is:
– At least 30 years of age.
– A United States citizen for at least 9 years.
– Retaining residency in the state that he or she chooses to represent by the time of the election.
Actually, running for Senate and holding office as a senator is much more complicated.

First, you will – at least in this era’s political landscape – need money for a campaign, or at least backers who can financially support your campaign. How you go about that is entirely your choice, but generally, the average cost of a winner’s campaign was $10 million or more raised. If you are running in one of the larger states like Florida or California, you can double or triple that number, respectively.

You must learn how the Senate works and what you would be doing. The Senate’s job as legislators is to vote, amend and discuss draft bills that pass the House of Representatives, so they can be either signed or vetoed by the President. Senators can also introduce legislation in the form of a joint resolution, which is virtually identical to a bill.

Aside from that, the Senate’s duty is to provide advice and consent to nominations and treaties. Also, Senators can be a part of congressional committees, which are essentially specialized groups of Senators who discuss issues like Foreign Relations, Finance, Armed Services and more.

Essentially, the qualifications for Senate are more complex than the simple list above. Senators do much more than simply being a 30-year-old citizen of nine years who lives a state that he or she wants to run for. They are dignified, educated individuals who must make tough decisions for the future of our country.

James Hardison

Photo: Flickr

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About Author

James Hardison

James writes for The Borgen Project from Gainesville, FL. His academic interests include English and Law. James enjoys climbing cranes and other adrenaline rushing activities!

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