‘Eradicate Extreme Poverty’ Should Be Among New UN Goals, says David Cameron

0

David Cameron, the British Prime Minister, has insisted that eradicating extreme poverty must be one of the UN”s new goals after Millennium Development Goals expire in 2015. Moreover, he argues that it is possible to eradicate extreme poverty.

The UN has received various demands to be included in the new UN goals. But in co-chairing a high-level panel with Libya and Indonesia, Cameron has emphasized the need to expand the moral base and responsibility of capitalism, including transparency in taxation. Both companies and governments should be subjected to transparency so that lowering of inequality and development of growth can be achieved simultaneously.

In spite of facing opposition from his own party at home, Cameron has dedicated 0.7% of UK’s GDP to aid. As chairman of the G8 Summit, Cameron has pledged to push those leaders of western countries who have not met their promises in the aid sector.

Cameron believes that the G8’s in-built accountability system enables the committee to evaluate members’ promises and actions. He is also convinced that the G8 and the UN development goals can join hands and create an atmosphere for engaging with eradication of global poverty, as was done in 2005 under UK’s chairmanship.

Cameron also talked about critical governance issues that should inspire and attract richer countries to engage with aid: conflict, corruption, absence of justice, and restricted access to law inform growth, development, and reduction in poverty. Only money does not resolve the crisis of global poverty.  Long-term sustainable engagement with these issues will gradually reduce and eradicate poverty around the world.

People should not be living under $1 a day; nor should 1 in 10 children not be able to live to see their fifth year. The UN goals can set their heart, mind, and funds to eradicate extreme poverty.

– Mantra Roy

Source: The Guardian
Photo: The Blue Nation

Share.

About Author

admin

BORGEN Magazine is an initiative of The Borgen Project.

Comments are closed.